+

Modular Gridshells

+

MASSING HEURISTICS

+

BIOMIM PAVILLION

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 ECHOES.PARIS, Sébastien Perrault+

PARAGIS

+

SENLIS

Annotations:
  • mettre en perspective quasi instantanément des milliers de données parfois contradictoires

Tags:

Annotations:
  • the work of a computational designer means taking a problem—such as translating a design intention into a user interface—and using software to generate solutions to automate aspects of the creation process. A computational designer, Ong says, “defines the constraints of the system and writes code that can generate design outputs.”

Tags:

Annotations:
  • Design by algorithm
  • 1. Variables
  • 2. Loops
  • 3. Conditionals
  • 4. Functions
  • 5. Objects
  • Computational strategies for defining design spaces
    • Morphological control through continuous variables
    • State-change control through discrete variables
    • Recursive control through functions and rule sets
    • Behavioral control through object-oriented programming

Tags:

On January 21, 2002 60 Minutes aired an episode on Frank Gery's office and Rick Smith introducing their efforts in developing computer technology for architecture over the previous decade. Rick Smith was an aerospace engineer for 12 years previous t…

Annotations:

Tags:

Annotations:
  • there is a missing link in the digital chain between the construction idea and its fabrication, which was – and still is – inhibiting an efficient digital process.
  • our business model is mainly based on our enthusiasm for great buildings and a large portion of laziness
  • In non-standard, complex-geometry, pre-fabrication projects many questions need to be asked (and answered) at an earlier planning stage.
  • Design-to-Production provided a full digital-planning, 3D-models and fabrication data.
  • is about the smart setup of a project workflow.
  • impossible without digital pre-fabrication
  • Therefore, the fabricator needed a precise digital fabrication model, and at 1,800 bespoke components it was also rather obvious that nobody wanted to model them by hand. So, a parametric model was created, that generated all the intricate details automatically
  • we use one of the cheapest 3D modelling programs available on the market (Rhino from McNeel), and we exploit it by extending its abilities with our own tools and plugins we program, often project-specific.
  • “design patterns”
  • large scale parametric digital 3D models
  • We are plugging into the other project partners’ workflows and provide digital information in a way they can use without additional effort

Tags:

Annotations:
  • The ascendance of computational design tools, in concert with the automated production of construction documents and specifications, will greatly reduce the number of people needed to complete architectural design services.
  • recent advancements in digital processing are beginning to coalesce in such a way that they’ll soon outstrip an architect’s ability to devise design iterations.
  • This method will be embraced because the advantages are too great to resist: buildings will be designed in a fraction of the time needed today, with a fraction of the effort. They will likely perform better than today’s buildings and, with an infinite range of design options to choose from, they will probably look better, too.
  • the architect of tomorrow will be a curator, defining problems instead of solving them.
  • The idea of applying design thinking to anything, from the structure of a company to the format of an educational curriculum, seems to be undergoing universal adoption very quickly

Tags:

Annotations:
  • Since the timeline for Concept design phase is generally short, designers tend to use tools that are better suited to design exploration than design interrogation. It also makes sense, in Concept design phase, to keep the model ‘nimble’ since designers may not yet have the ‘information’ part of BIM
  • BIM models are by their very nature large complex datasets. As a result, allowing users to parametrically explore such models may severely reduce the latency and robustness of the system
  • Therefore, it is better for designers to create a federated BIM model using Computational BIM workflows rather than struggle with the limitations of any one BIM system
  • categorized Computational BIM workflows as either Tightly Coupled (Fully compatible) or Loosely Coupled (Fully interoperable)

Tags:

Annotations:
  • Computational BIM workflows that are currently in use in the AEC Industry.
  • Geometry Gym

     

    A complicated workflow, but allows for greater parametric control over IFC properties.

  • VisualARQ

     

    An easy-to-use Rhino to IFC plugin.

  • Hummingbird

     

    Works well for simple projects with repetitive elements.

  • Grevit

     

    A promising plugin for Rhino/GH & SketchUP to Revit interoperability

  • Rhynamo & Mantis Shrimp

     

    One of the better Rhino-Revit interoperability plugins

  • Flux

     

    The future of software interoperability and collaboration

  • GH-ARCHICAD Live Connection & Rhino-GDL Converter.

     

    The best-in-class Computational BIM workflow ever

  • create a federated BIM model using Computational BIM workflows rather than struggle with the limitations of any one BIM system

Tags:

Annotations:
  • marketing of knowledge
  • desire to inexpensively transfer knowledge
  • The value of encapsulation lies in the avoidance of the cost of learning to make use of the encapsulated knowledge

Tags:

.@enneadarch what's a *computational #BIM specialist*? @archinate explains https://t.co/YjCeIAzoWu & MIT's… https://t.co/m5RiWipb6X

Annotations:
  • what a ‘computational design’ position actually means in a business setting
  • specializing in geometric complexity
  • automating project design studies and creating variations
  • problem-solving methodology
  • A computational designer should be able to describe the design problems they have encountered projects and how they developed the computational workflow to aid in their resolution
  • Like any designer, a computational designer should be able to reflect on the value of their methodology and explain how their method produced more desirable results for the project and the team
  • computational design is not BIM. BIM is also not computational design
  • company to think about how a range of skillsets can be built up over time
  • the company could focus on hiring or partnering with an expert in the field.
  • they should be interested to learn about the design challenges specific to your firm and describe a computational vision that can help lead your business to the best possible solution

Tags:

Annotations:
  • Architects who know basic programming concepts and understand algorithmic thinking can communicate more effectively with programmers
  • designer fluent in Grasshopper and Dynamo can extend the capabilities of Rhino and Autodesk Revit
  • Translating this data into spaces that not only perform better
  • Ask a client for their profit-and-loss sheet to see how the building is going to help run their business better
  • Because buildings are intensive in their energy and material consumption, architects with a grasp on “climate-specific building design and whole-building performance” will be sought by owners and developers
  • This multidisciplinary skill set may seem idealistic or improbable, but many architects already assume their job description includes lifelong learning. So the better you’re at diversifying yourself, Kilkelly says, “the more interesting your career will be.”

Tags:

Annotations:
  • "Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it." - Alan J. Perlis

Tags:

Annotations:
  • content (information) and relationships (organization)
  • Biological algorithms such as fractal generation, cellular automata, and structure-preserving transformations lead to vernacular and traditional architectural and urban forms, which are therefore the genuine product of evolutionary developmen
  • Lecture 1: Recursion and the Fibonacci sequence. Universal  scaling. Biophilia
  • Lecture 2: Geometric Recursion and Fractals. The Sierpinski  gasket. Perforation, bending, and folding. Anti-gravity  anxiety. Architecture of the horizontal
  • Lecture 3: Universal distribution of sizes. Fractal design,  ornament, and biophilia. Sustainable systems
  • Lecture 4: Cellular automata. Sierpinski carpets and  sea-shells. Design in hyperspace and connection to the sacred
  • Lecture 5: Harmony-seeking computations. Architectural  harmony. Alexander's theory of centers. Design as computation.  Computational reducibility
  • Lecture 6: Alexander's 15 Fundamental Properties. Three  laws of architecture
  • Lecture 7: Biologically-inspired computation. Genetic  algorithms. Computation versus memory retrieval. Evolutionary  regression
  • Lecture 8: Emergent systems. Examples from Artificial Life.  Inhuman experiments. Architectural education
  • Lecture 9: Symmetry production. Symmetry breaking.  Classical moldings. Elementary particle symmetries. Binding  energy
  • Lecture 10: Generative codes and their application to  building and urban morphology. Secularization destroys public  space. Spiritual architects. Legalizing codes
  • Lecture 11: Duany-Plater-Zyberk (DPZ) codes. The New  Urbanism. Stephen Mouzon's project. Tall buildings
  • Lecture 12: Implementation of generative codes in design.  Urban plazas. Designing for children. Favelas and social  housing

Tags:

Of the many potentialities afforded by the computer, one of the most significant is its capacity to operate as a search engine. If, then, we think through the logic of the search in the context of ‘design’, what such an approach suggests is that if all possible solutions already exist, it is simply a question of defining a set of constraints and conducting a search, and then selecting one of the many outcomes. The potential implications of this are far reaching. Not only does it challenge the traditional notion of the ‘genius’ of the architect/designer and the originality of the work of art, but it also suggests that if there is still any creativity in the ‘design’ process, it should lie, firstly, in defining the constraints that generate the range of possible solutions to a problem, and, secondly, in developing an effective method of filtering or evaluating them.

Neil Leach, ‘There is No Such Thing as Digital Design’, in David Gerber, Mariana Ibanez (eds.), Paradigms in Computing: Making, Machines, and Models for Design Agency in Architecture, Los Angeles: eVolo Press, 2014, pp. 148-158

Tags:

Intuition plays a large part in architecture, because we don't have an IBM machine big enough to take all the factors into consideration. So, you depend on intuition. But, boy! Wherever you can apply straight thinking or IBM machine methods or thlngs like that, you absolutely have to do it

Eero Saarinen, 1959

 

Tags:

The idea becomes a machine that makes the art

Sol Lewitt, Paragraphs in Conceptual Art

Tags:

The work of a computational designer means taking a problem and using software to generate solutions to automate aspects of the creation process
 

John Maeda

Tags:

Algorithms are nothing more than an opportunity to create an architecture that respires

Toyo Ito

Tags:

Computational design is the application of computational strategies to the design process. While designers traditionally rely on intuition and experience to solve design problems, computational design aims to enhance that process by encoding design decisions using a computer language. The goal isn't to document the final result necessarily, but rather the steps required to create that result

Michael Kikelly

Tags:

    Peters, Terri, and Brady Peters. 2017. Computing the environment.
    Fink, Daniel. n.d. “Complex Urbanities : Digital Techniques in Urban Design.”
    Sheil, Bob, Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen, Martin Tamke, and Sean Hanna. 2020. Design transactions: rethinking information modelling for a new material age.
    Alexander, Christopher. n.d. “Harmony-Seeking Computations: A Science of Non-Classical Dynamics Based on the Progressive Evolution of the Larger Whole,” 78.
    Peters, Brady, and Terri Peters, eds. 2013. Inside Smartgeometry: Expanding the Architectural Possibilities of Computational Design. AD Smart 01. Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    “HDR - DATA DRIVEN DESIGN, COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN  PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS  OPERATIONS DESIGN.Pdf.” n.d.
    Nourian, Ir Pirouz. n.d. “A Very Short Introduction to Computational Design,” 41.

    LEGAL NOTICE | CC BY-NC-ND

    Log in with your credentials

    Forgot your details?