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BIOMIM PAVILLION

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SENLIS

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  • Design by algorithm
  • 1. Variables
  • 2. Loops
  • 3. Conditionals
  • 4. Functions
  • 5. Objects
  • Computational strategies for defining design spaces
    • Morphological control through continuous variables
    • State-change control through discrete variables
    • Recursive control through functions and rule sets
    • Behavioral control through object-oriented programming

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  • Architects who know basic programming concepts and understand algorithmic thinking can communicate more effectively with programmers
  • designer fluent in Grasshopper and Dynamo can extend the capabilities of Rhino and Autodesk Revit
  • Translating this data into spaces that not only perform better
  • Ask a client for their profit-and-loss sheet to see how the building is going to help run their business better
  • Because buildings are intensive in their energy and material consumption, architects with a grasp on “climate-specific building design and whole-building performance” will be sought by owners and developers
  • This multidisciplinary skill set may seem idealistic or improbable, but many architects already assume their job description includes lifelong learning. So the better you’re at diversifying yourself, Kilkelly says, “the more interesting your career will be.”

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  • "Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it." - Alan J. Perlis

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  • Biological algorithms such as fractal generation, cellular automata, and structure-preserving transformations lead to vernacular and traditional architectural and urban forms, which are therefore the genuine product of evolutionary developmen
  • content (information) and relationships (organization)
  • Lecture 1: Recursion and the Fibonacci sequence. Universal  scaling. Biophilia
  • Lecture 2: Geometric Recursion and Fractals. The Sierpinski  gasket. Perforation, bending, and folding. Anti-gravity  anxiety. Architecture of the horizontal
  • Lecture 3: Universal distribution of sizes. Fractal design,  ornament, and biophilia. Sustainable systems
  • Lecture 4: Cellular automata. Sierpinski carpets and  sea-shells. Design in hyperspace and connection to the sacred
  • Lecture 5: Harmony-seeking computations. Architectural  harmony. Alexander's theory of centers. Design as computation.  Computational reducibility
  • Lecture 6: Alexander's 15 Fundamental Properties. Three  laws of architecture
  • Lecture 7: Biologically-inspired computation. Genetic  algorithms. Computation versus memory retrieval. Evolutionary  regression
  • Lecture 8: Emergent systems. Examples from Artificial Life.  Inhuman experiments. Architectural education
  • Lecture 9: Symmetry production. Symmetry breaking.  Classical moldings. Elementary particle symmetries. Binding  energy
  • Lecture 10: Generative codes and their application to  building and urban morphology. Secularization destroys public  space. Spiritual architects. Legalizing codes
  • Lecture 11: Duany-Plater-Zyberk (DPZ) codes. The New  Urbanism. Stephen Mouzon's project. Tall buildings
  • Lecture 12: Implementation of generative codes in design.  Urban plazas. Designing for children. Favelas and social  housing

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The idea becomes a machine that makes the art

Sol Lewitt, Paragraphs in Conceptual Art

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Algorithms are nothing more than an opportunity to create an architecture that respires

Toyo Ito

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An algorithm must be seen to be believed

Donald Knuth 

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    The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants. n.d.

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