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URBANYTICS

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Performance Atlas

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MASSING HEURISTICS

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SENLIS

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  • From Autoplastic to Alloplastic
  • Comme, chez Bergson, l'objet ne peut être séparé de son processus génétique : l'architecture ne produit pas un objet, mais un champ potentiel de forces
  • retour à la forme " décora(c)tive " (Decoi)
  • l'architecture se donne comme une proposition générative d'espace-temps évolutif
  • l'enjeu consiste à créer non pas une forme, mais une possibilité de forme, non pas une architecture, mais une possibilité d'architecture, au sein d'un système créatif ouvert, dans les interstices desquels se tient l'architecture

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    • Autoplastic adaptation: The subject tries to change himself, i.e. the internal environment.
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    • Alloplastic adaptation: The subject tries to change the situation, i.e. the external environment

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  • Carpo who are talking about a reemergence of vitalistic and irrational forces in the domain of computational design. He talks, even, about magic, or indeterminacy
  • you design a system of evaluation in the end
  • post-optimization
  • That idea is based on risk mitigation
  • delay design decisions until they can best decide what the impact of those design decisions are
  • Rather than making that kind of grand gesture at the start of the project, they’re able to make it at the end of the projec
  • computational tools enable the architect to decrease the gap
  • The question that I have about that is, if computation is making us more efficient, and if computation is changing the design process in this really profound way, will there be space for anyone who doesn’t know how to do it?
  • coding is something that we really need to know, not in order to be competitive, but to be able to say something in the future within our own discourse
  • We are currently working on a project that aims to create an open source platform for students to upload their codes and tools where you will be able to hack and build upon someone else’s too
  • accepted notion that there is an authorless condition of the architect within computational design
  • The job of the designer isn’t so much to come up with a design, but to discover why the design is needed
  • phenomenology
  • That’s a problem of what you can quantify practically versus what is quantifiable in a theoretical sense. What we can quantify today isn’t necessarily what is quantifiable in the world

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  • "Good design doesn’t cost, but it pays." [Richard H. Driehaus]
  • good design is potentially good business
  • signature architects
  • office buildings designed by signature architects have rents that are 5-7% higher and sell for prices 17% higher
  • "Good design is good business." [Thomas Watson, Jr.]
  • Good design depends on a good design process.
  • great designers have taught us how to translate the inherent complexities of architectural design into subsets of interlinked decisions with an eye on the overall result
  • "When I am working on a problem, I never think about beauty. I only think about how to solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong." [Richard Buckminster ‘Bucky’ Fuller]
  • consider what kind of elements may justify a premium
  • design beyond the baseline minimum necessity
  • the premium is justified on the basis of the value of the design
  • buildings with high environmental ratings are attracting tenants quicker than similar buildings without ratings
  • The challenge remains how to manage and deliver projects where longevity and worth are valued along with cost and price
  • Educated clients and developers realise that good design – including high performance – is good business – Green is the colour of money
  • "What works good is better than what looks good.  Because what works good lasts." [Ray Eames]

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  • all designers are curious to know the potential performance impacts of their decisions - after all, even the smallest design changes can affect many different performance criteria so it is much better to know than not know
  • Moreover, it would also mean that designers themselves could undertake many of the initial aspects of the building analysis, iterating through a wide range of options before calling in their engineers for verification and validation

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  • 10 groups based on cumulative direct heat gain values
  • The patterns range from simple and open to complex and dense. The dense patterns are applied to the groupings with high solar exposure while the open panel types are applied to regions primarily in shade

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  • designers have the challenge of not only meeting quantitative requirements but also, and more importantly to solve them spatially, i.e. to design those elements and devices that allow the control of light penetration.
  • It is this delicate balance between quantitative performance and geometric variables that calls for an integrated optimisation strategy
  • In order to fully exploit the implicit parallelism described by the Schema Theory and therefore increase the chances to arrive at near optimal solutions, a binary digit coding system has been implemented
  • The genetic algorithm selects a string of bits (chromosome) in accordance to how well they respond to a solution (fitness) and then recombine them to produce new ones (offspring)

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  • However, when the building design industry talks about efficiency, it almost exclusively means operational efficiency: a measure of a building's ability to provide functionality, comfort and amenity whilst minimising energy use and other forms of environmental impac
    • Are high-tech, highly efficient buildings actually sustainable?
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    • Are there better ways to achieve more sustainable efficiencies?
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    • Are we really looking in the right place for them?
  • Drawing lessons from this, perhaps the simplest and most obvious design response is for us to adapt our buildings to capitalise as much as possible on everything the site and its local environment have to offer
  • It is also a call for us to re-evaluate where we look for design efficiencies.
  • It is proposed here that most of the operational energy savings we are after don't need high-tech solutions but can actually be found right there on site
  • putting the building in the right place with the right shape and facing the right way
  • Right Place: Where on the site is the best position to make use of daylight, direct solar gains, cooling breezes, natural shading, geothermal energy or wind power?
  • Right Shape: Is it possible to use parts of the building to protect other parts that need it, to build in shading, duct natural ventilation, reflect light or form thermal buffers?
  • Right Orientation: What is the best direction to face windows for maximum solar collection, daylight availability or summer shading?
  • It is important to note that pretty well all these criteria are usually resolved within the first few weeks of a design project. If you think about it, they represent the most important factors affecting the overall thermal and energy performance of a building. Yet with just a little extra design effort on decisions that you have to make anyway, huge long-term economies and efficiencies are possible.
  • what we're really talking about is a process of 'optioneering'. This means generating, simulating and analysing a wide range of different design configurations to see how they stand up against a wide range of performance criteria, right from the beginning of each design
  • the performance of many building types can be quite counter-intuitive
  • It must be possible to design buildings that can actually do a few things for themselves
  • Why can't they self clean to some extent, or even grow food, generate heat and energy, provide natural habitat and actually increase public amenity.
  • What is being suggested here are positive impacts rather than just minimal impacts
  • Make best use of local and renewable resources.

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Algorithms are nothing more than an opportunity to create an architecture that respires

Toyo Ito

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    “IBPSA 2015 Proceedings.” 2015.
    Ekici, Berk, Cemre Cubukcuoglu, Michela Turrin, and I. Sevil Sariyildiz. 2019. "Performative computational architecture using swarm and evolutionary optimisation: A review." Building and Environment 147: 356–71. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.10.023.
    “Architecture. Energy. 2011.” 2011. Loisos + Ubbelohde.
    Mackey, Christopher. 2015. “Pan Climatic Humans.”
    Peters, Terri, and Brady Peters. 2017. Computing the environment.
    Kolarevic, Branko, and Ali Malkawi, eds. 2005. Performative Architecture: Beyond Instrumentality. New York: Spon Press.
    Kolarevic, Branko. n.d. “02 Digital Morphogenesis,” 18.
    Wortmann, Thomas. 2017. "Surveying design spaces with performance maps: A multivariate visualization method for parametric design and architectural design optimization." International Journal of Architectural Computing 15 (1): 38–53. https://doi.org/10.1177/1478077117691600.
    Hensel, Michael, and Achim Menges, eds. 2008. Versatility and Vicissitude: Performance in Morpho-Ecological Design. Architectural Design Profile 192. Chichester: Wiley.
    Natanian, Jonathan. n.d. “ARCHITECTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM.”
    Li, Shaoxiong, Le Liu, and Changhai Peng. 2020. "A Review of Performance-Oriented Architectural Design and Optimization in the Context of Sustainability: Dividends and Challenges." Sustainability 12 (4): 1427. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041427.
    Lee, Sang. n.d. Aesthetics of Sustainable Architecture.

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